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Impressive church on view after programme of repairs

Long concealed by hoardings, scaffolding and temporary roof covering, St George’s Headstone, Pinner View, is again visible to the public.

Works to the building lasting a year and costing over half a million pounds excluding VAT involved the complete re-tiling of the roof, the repair and or replacement of bricks, stone parapets, gutters, drainpipes and flashing, the re-pointing of bricks and stone, and a good deal of internal re-plastering and painting.

Impressive church on view after programme of repairs Harrow Online
Church interior, June 2020.

The main body of St George’s, consecrated in 1911, was designed by architect J S Alder in an Arts & Crafts-inspired brick and stone Gothic style; the building was completed in 1961. The lofty, beautifully proportioned interior is enhanced by an ensemble of distinguished furnishings and fixings, especially the work of leading early twentieth century ecclesiastical artist Martin Travers and his sculptor and chief assistant John Crawford – both tutors at the Royal College of Art. The church’s 1915 pipe organ by Frederick Rothwell – who in 1922 moved his organ works from Willesden to Bonnersfield Lane, Harrow – is the largest instrument he built entirely as new.

Impressive church on view after programme of repairs Harrow Online
Detail from Te Deum window by Martin Travers

Practical completion of the repairs to the church by Universal Stone was confirmed on 29 May by architect Ian Angus of conservation specialists Carden & Godfrey. Having been closed to worshippers and visitors since the beginning of the lockdown at the end of March, St George’s will be open for private prayer and meditation on forthcoming Sundays from 10 am to 1 pm, beginning 21 June. “I’m delighted that recently amended government rules enable us to open the building again” says Stephen Keeble, Vicar of St George’s.  “It will be a joy to see people in the building again, whether to pray, reflect, or draw inspiration from the peaceful, harmonious ambience. Christians, members of other religions, and people of secular faiths are all very welcome.”