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HomeArticlesThe Greene Effect: Novelist Graham Greene's connection with Harrow

The Greene Effect: Novelist Graham Greene’s connection with Harrow

Many regarded Graham Greene as an eminent figure in twenty-century literature, a respected journalist, and a prolific novelist.

Mr Greene is an oddity. Well-versed in all facets of writing. Notably, his transparent prose style will leave an indelible mark on those who choose to indulge him. “When he was young, he had thought love had something to do with understanding, but with age he knew that no human being understood another.

Love was the wish to understand, and presently with constant failure the wish died, and love died too perhaps or changed into this painful affection, loyalty, pity.”—Graham Greene. His first publications were in the late 1920s, with novels like The Man Within, Stamboul Train, and It’s a Battlefield.

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Mr Greene was a disciplinarian. “Over twenty years, I have probably averaged five hundred words a day for five days a week. I can produce a novel in a year.”— Graham Greene.

Graham Greene’s novel England Made Me’s central theme was nationalism. Published in 1935, four years before the Second World War, Mr Greene ironically did not sense the danger looming over central Europe and the deadly force nationalism was in the near destruction of western culture.

The story’s plot is based in Sweden and is about separated twins, Kate and Antony (Tony) Farrant, who are distinctively different in temperament and outlook. Antony Farrant pretends that he has been educated at Harrow School. Fernando Minty, a quirky figure and an alumnus of the Harrow, questions the validity of his claim when he sees Anthony wearing a Harrovian tie.

Antony flails under interrogation and reveals his fraudulent character. England Made Me is a maturing novel from a master craft man learning his trade. The novel is still in circulation and available in bookshops, charity shops and libraries in the harrow borough if one is willing to snoop around.